My Top Television of the Decade!

I’ve reflected on my theatregoing over the decade and before I look ahead to 2020, I wanted to look back at some of the fantastic television that appeared on my screen over the last 10 years.

For me, there was so much to enjoy and with the ever growing platforms, seeing everything is now just impossible and therefore I’m fully aware that my list probably won’t include some shows that you may think should have been included, so let me know what yours were. I might not even have watched them!

1. Suits (2011 – 2019)

There really could only be one show at the top of my list. Not only was Suits a series that I’ve found entertaining and engaging since 2011 when it first appeared on Dave (that’s a channel here in the UK), before later moving to Netflix, it also provided me with some of my favourite television characters and relationships of the last ten years too. For me to truly invest in a series, especially over 8 seasons, I need to care about the characters and Suits certainly provided so many characters to root for. Whether it was quirky Louis Litt, who you couldn’t stand and then loved, the complex emotional development of Harvey Specter, the bromance of him and protege Mike Ross, or the force that was Jessica Pearson, the determination of paralegal Rachel Zane, or the fabulous Donna Paulsen, whose self-confidence saw her soar, there was a character for every viewer.

Then of course there was Darvey. If you’ve read this blog for any length of time, you’ll know how much I loved the Donna and Harvey dynamic, making it my favourite on screen relationship (sorry Mulder & Scully). Not only all of this, but thanks to Suits and the positive aspects of social media, I’ve made some wonderful friends through the series, as well as it providing an excuse for some Toronto holidays. You were fabulous Suits. You’ll be missed.

2. Game of Thrones (2011 – 2019)

I know so many people have declared the entire of Game of Thrones trash now, due to their annoyance at season eight and that’s fair enough, but for me, it’ll remain one of the best television series created and remains a favourite. Yes, season 8 was rushed. The story strands needed a few more episodes to breathe in the way they did in earlier years, but I genuinely didn’t hate any of it and mostly expected the conclusions that occurred, with the final episode not proving a let down for me (I’ve had that feeling with shows I’ve loved, so I feel for anyone who felt that way).

Crucially, I still view the series as a whole and in doing so simply see a series that brought wonderful characters to life, whether good or dreadfully unpleasant, or somewhere in between, by a superb ensemble of actors. With such a vast story to tell, any weak acting links would have damaged the series as a whole, which thankfully didn’t happen. Visually it was gorgeous (I would still happily pay to watch it on a big screen) and the accompanying score, especially in later years, was an extra character of the series. Lastly, it raised the audience expectation of what television should be and therefore helped raised the quality of television as a result.

3. Sherlock (2010 – 2017?)

They may be starting off 2020 with a new adaptation of a classic on BBC One, but its’s the first joint effort by Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss, which started in the summer of 2010, that I wanted to talk about now. Sherlock was another series that helped change television. It was clever, exciting, engaging and with two such superb lead performances from Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, we shouldn’t be surprised how successful it (and its actors) have become. Yes, for me, the last series wasn’t as strong as previous ones (and certainly not the level reached by season 2), but it remained a must-watch drama that surpassed a lot of the competition. It might be back one day. I certainly hope so.

4. Line of Duty (2012 – present)

Bodyguard may have exploded in the US, earning recognition at the television awards, but it was Jed Mercurio’s first series that was unmissable viewing over the decade. Late to the party, I caught up as series two started and the interest began to grow following that shocker of a season two opener and I’ve been hooked ever since. Yes, series 3 was the pinnacle for me and those seasons since haven’t quite been as impressive, or as unpredictable, but Line of Duty is still one of the best dramas on television. Not only is the core team of Martin Compston, Vicky McClure and Adrian Dunbar always brilliant, but the guest casts have provided some of the highlights of the decade, especially Keeley Hawes and Craig Parkinson. Roll on season 6!

5. Succession (2018 – present)

Having missed Succession last year, I finally joined the fan club this year, after a number of friends told me I was missing out. They were certainly correct about that, with the series providing some of the finest written and acted scripts on television at the moment. The fact the writing team includes a few playwrights doesn’t surprise me, with certain scenes feeling as if they are part of a stage play. Also, it’s very rare that a series only gets better and better, but that’s true of Succession, with its second series standing out as some of the best television I’ve seen. Its ensemble is also another big strength – Brian Cox, Jeremy Strong (who is being criminally overlooked by the awards), Kieran Culkin, Sarah Snook, Matthew Macfadyen and Nicholas Braun all bring such life to these characters, as do the other supporting cast. Yes, I may not like many of them, but I love watching them. Hurry up series 3!

6. Broadchurch (2013 – 2017)

Olivia Colman may now be an Oscar winning superstar, but my favourite performance of hers of this decade is easily that of Ellie Miller in Broadchurch, alongside David Tennant. From the moment I saw episode one at a preview screening, I suspected this was going to be a very promising series and indeed series one went on to become a national talking point for weeks. The story of the murder of a young boy in a picturesque seaside town, it was tense (heightened by the superbly atmospheric score), emotional and yet still found moments for lightness, mainly thanks to the dynamic between Tennant and Colman. Later seasons may not have been as popular, but I enjoyed each series and was very sad to see it end.

7. Parade’s End (2012)

A second series for Benedict Cumberbatch on my list is Parade’s End, the five part series, adapted by Tom Stoppard, that aired on the BBC (and HBO in the USA) and his role of Christopher Tietjens is, in my opinion, in some respects better than his work on Sherlock. It was such a moving and powerful story, anchored by Cumberbatch, Rebecca Hill and Adelaide Clemens, telling the story of three people whose lives have such a significant impact on each other and are all affected by the First World War, especially Tietjens. Beautifully shot, this adaptation of a book I have struggled to try and read in the past, is a series I continue to return to every so often.

8. The Crown (2016 – present)

I’ve already spoken about the quality of television upping its game over the decade and another example of a series whose quality would in the past have been reserved for the big screen, is The Crown. Chronicling the life and reign of Queen Elizabeth II, it impressed me right from the start (with its first two episodes remaining some of the best television of the decade for me). The production values are crazy on this series, whether the sets, costumes or score, everything is superb. Not only that, but without the talent of the original cast, including Claire Foy, Matt Smith. Vanessa Kirby, Jared Harris and John Lithgow, it was easy to forget this wasn’t real! Although I preferred the earlier years of the first two series, the third series (led by Olivia Colman) was still excellent television. Whether I’ll be able to sit through later seasons, as it delves in to the tragedies of the 1990s is yet to be seen, but The Crown was certainly a highlight of the last decade.

9. The Good Wife (2009 – 2016)

I admit that I didn’t love the last two seasons of The Good Wife, where I felt it lost its way a little, but it was still a firm favourite of the last ten years. This was an intelligent and engaging legal drama, during which we watched Alicia Florrick navigate a return to the legal profession after taking years away to raise her family, all for her husband to thank her by humiliating her on a national scale. Not only were the cases interesting, but the relationships of the characters kept me invested, as I rooted for Alicia to ditch her dreadful husband (Chris Noth) and pursue a relationship with colleague and old friend Will (the superb Josh Charles). Yet, my favourite relationship of The Good Wife? The friendship between Will and Diane (Christine Baranski). I loved them and could have watched them for years more.

10. The Hour (2011 – 2012)

I still don’t understand why the BBC stopped making The Hour after only two seasons. It was well received, won awards (including in the US at a time when this seemed less common) and had one of the finest casts of the time – Ben Whishaw, Romola Garai, Dominic West, Anna Chancellor all helped bring this series about a television news programme and its staff, set in the 1950s, to life. I know writer Abi Morgan has spoken in the past about her desire to return to the story, perhaps in a film and I still hold on to hope that we’ll see that one day.

11. Breaking Bad (2008 – 2013)

Yes, this series straddled two decades, but seeing as it only continued to get better and better, culminating in such an incredible final season, it had to be included on this list. A series fully deserving of all the acclaim it received, everything about Breaking Bad lives up to expectation – the writing, directorial choices and cinematography, combined with such phenomenal acting, doesn’t come around too often. Plus it ended perfectly. It may not be a show I’ll return to as often as others on this list, whose characters I loved more, but Breaking Bad was comfortably one of the best shows ever made for television.

………

So, those are my television choices of the last decade. It really has been an impressive period for the small screen. Hopefully the 2020’s will continue to maintain this level of quality!

Television Review – It’s time to say goodbye to Game of Thrones – 8.06 “The Iron Throne”

And now their watch has ended……

After eight seasons, sadly the words of The Night’s Watch now apply to the millions of Game of Thrones fans (including me) across the globe, following the airing of the series finale, aptly entitled The Iron Throne (although I admit, I was hoping for A Dream of Spring). As I’ve said at the start of my other season 8 reviews, I’ve taken a few days to let the episode sink in; I’ve watched it a number of times now and finally think I can put my thoughts in order on the page.

I know I’m going to be in the minority with this opinion, but I enjoyed the finale and found it to be a satisfying way to leave the world we’ve been exploring since episode one. In fact the more times I watch it, the better I think it is and I say this as someone whose first television love “blessed” me with not one, but two, dreadful series finales.

Anyone still reading?!

Before I dive in to all the levels of this episode, I’ll say again the point I raised last week in my review of The Bells. Do I think the series would have been stronger as a whole had there been eight 10 episode seasons? Without a doubt. There are scenes between characters that I’m sorry we didn’t get to see (Littlefinger & Varys; the Stark sisters hearing about Jon), stories that I’d have loved to have been stretched a bit longer (The Hound & Arya travelling South, Varys’ plotting, lots more Cersei!) and internal emotional struggles of characters that would have been richer had they had more time to be explored (Dany’s disintegration; Jaime’s conflicted struggles both before and in the weeks after he arrived and chose to stay at Winterfell following the battle (no that wasn’t all one night as many keep saying); and Jon dealing fully with who he is). That’s only a few examples and I agree it’s frustrating. Very frustrating, especially when HBO were offering the time and the money! It would, without question, have made the journey to the end fuller and crucially, removed my biggest problem with this season – the sense of rushing through it.

Yet, I’m setting that aside when writing about the finale, instead judging The Iron Throne on its own merits as an episode and for me, it did far more right than it did wrong, meaning it did thankfully leave me feeling satisfied.

……..that said, let’s take a closer look at my reasons for saying that…….

After weeks of rushing ahead, finally the pace slowed down and the story was better for it

Despite all I’ve said about the pace this year, The Iron Throne seemed to take its time and the emotional storylines benefited. Having the opening ten minutes contain very little dialogue and instead focus of the tragedy and reality of Dany’s actions, was unexpected and very welcome, as was the long emotionally-powered character scenes that weren’t rushed at all, but given all the time they needed (Tyrion and Jon’s frank conversation, Jon and Dany’s final moments, Tyrion’s grief, and Brienne’s gesture all being examples). Should all season have been this way? Yes, but I’m relieved the finale managed to find this balance.

A finale that was both dark and yet also hopeful

The Iron Throne was clearly structured to be an episode of two emotional halves; the first one of darkness and the second being one of hope and that choice worked very well. As difficult as it was to see Dany embrace her darker tendencies, I found the myself gripped by how dark the show had become. The tension, as she makes clear the war has only just begun, the devastation everywhere you looked on screen, the painful struggles of grief of Tryion and Jon and the end of one of the show’s most iconic characters. It was powerful television. Yet, somewhat of a surprise to me, the story ended in a place of hope, as we see those still standing start to build a new Westeros. The tone becomes lighter, with time for humour (Tyrion straightening the chairs to no avail, the new Small Council dynamic – I’d watch a season of that show!), before leaving us hopeful for the lives ahead of characters we’ve spent years investing in. It would have been easy to get this balance wrong, but, in my opinion, that didn’t happen.

Tyrion Lannister takes his place back at the heart of the story & breaks my heart along the way

Tyrion is on almost everyone’s list of favourite characters and season eight has seen him have a larger role in the story once again, culminating in a truly superb performance by Peter Dinklage in the finale. Finally slowing the pace of this year down, it’s Tyrion who takes us in to the horror of King’s Landing in the aftermath of Dany’s actions. We seen his pain, his guilt and his horror, as he walks through those streets in near silence, before wandering through rooms that have witnessed so many huge moments in his life, including when his father told him he wanted to drown him at birth, where he and Cersei fought so often and where Small Councils ridiculed him. You feel the weight of history with him as he walks.

And when I didn’t think it could get any worse, instead of looking for Dany, I realised he was searching out the fate of his brother. Sure, there should have been rubble all over that floor, piled high even, but that gripe aside, watching Tyrion understand the fate of his last remaining family, before removing the rubble from their dead bodies as he wept, is one of the most emotional scenes I’ve seen on television or film. I care about Tyrion and I cared about Jaime and therefore I felt his raw, visceral grief and anger and seeing him in such pain, as he knelt beside his lost family was heartbreaking. All in the first ten minutes! I see another Emmy nomination in Dinklage’s future!

From there, we saw Tyrion defy his Queen (I did think he was going to try and kill her for a moment), speak hard truths to Jon Snow (there have been too few long character-driven scenes such as the one between Dinklage and Kit Harington this season) and then go on to shape the structure of the new world. Through his portrayal Dinklage brought humour, sadness and depth out of Tyrion this week and to see him end back in King’s Landing, in the role he excelled at in season 2 was the perfect ending for him. Long live The Imp!

Emilia Clarke ends with perhaps her strongest performance of the whole series

Seeing Dany burn down King’s Landing wasn’t something anyone wanted to see (well, maybe some of you did, who knows), but I’d always suspected this would be where her story would take us. Yes, it would have been for the benefit of the story had we had longer to really see her disintegration (although if I’d lost all the things she lost in a few weeks, I may well have snapped too), as well as more scenes in the aftermath of last week’s actions to try and see her true emotional state and have her justify why she attacked innocent people after they’d surrendered (the fact this was glossed over is one of my big grumbles with 8.06), but she clearly didn’t take pleasure in mass murder. She simply seemed indifferent to it, so perhaps she had truly become so lost in her vision of the future that she was blind to the casualties she was ready to sacrifice along the way. I also found it interesting to hear Tyrion and Jon have the same passionate debate about her, that fans have been engaging in all week!

What is clear though, is the tremendous acting of Emilia Clarke. She’s helped create an iconic, unforgettable, screen character and her performance in 8.06 was arguably her best of the whole series. She was frightening in those opening scenes and yet I saw glimpses of the young woman from earlier seasons in the moments before she died, which made her end all the more heartbreaking. Would I have wanted this to end differently, to see her break the wheel in more the way it is actually broken by the end? Of course, but despite how her story ended, Daenerys Targaryen will always be one of the most pivotal characters in the story and Clarke has simply been superb from start to finish.

An unlikely King, but when you think about it, it makes surprising sense

So, I wasn’t one of the people who predicted Bran being chosen as King and I admit that my initial reaction was surprise and amusement. Bran? He’s done nothing all season and now he gets to he King?! Really?! and that name? Bran the Broken? You couldn’t think of something a bit nicer, Tyrion?! Yet, when I took time to think about it, the choice does make sense. After centuries of war and power-mad rulers sitting on The Iron Throne, who better to lead Westeros in to the future, than someone who has no interest in power, or titles and who has the knowledge of all the past mistakes. Hell, even Tywin acknowledged that a good King should be wise and Bran has more wisdom than anyone else. I also appreciated the little costume detail for King Bran The Broken (still hate the name though) – he’s the first recognised ruler in Westeros we’ve seen who doesn’t appear to wear a crown, emphasising the fact he’s not doing it for the status.

It seems he’s also settled more in to his dual existence as both Bran and The Three-Eyed Raven by the end, even managing slight bemusement at his Small Council’s salute. Plus, could he have a better Small Council to help him? Sam, Davos, Brienne, Bronn and Tyrion – heck, that’s a good portion of my favourite characters. Go off looking for Drogon, Bran Stark, the realm is in safe hands!

A Song of Ice & Fire – at its heart, was always the story of the Starks

We all started this journey with the Starks. They were the family we cared about, invested in and mourned with, through every loss and defeat. There were times when it seemed House Stark would be crushed. Yet, this finale reminded us that this story has really always had this pack at its heart and at the end, they were thriving – each exactly where they were meant to be (blimey Bran’s rubbing off on me!) and that final montage, following Arya, Jon and Sansa as they each start along their new paths was incredibly moving and beautifully edited.

Seeing Arya embrace her identity again, sailing off in to unknown adventures, with a direwolf sigil flying proud on her sails made me smile. Hearing the hall of Northmen rally to the cries of “Queen in the North” for Sansa (notably the last words spoken on the series too), finally in control of her own fate after years being controlled and abused by others, made me proud of how far she’d come from that annoying brat in early season one, which leaves Jon…….

Jon Snow, having always done the right thing, no matter the personal cost, finally finds his place

I know many wanted Jon to be King at the end of the show and I admit, I thought it might happen (if he didn’t die along the way). It would have been bittersweet (and we knew to expect such an ending), as he certainly didn’t want the crown. He’d never really wanted to lead anyone. Instead, like the other Starks, Jon Snow, the character who didn’t let any House words define him, found his place. The seeds were sown early in the year when Tormund said Jon had the real north in him and he admitted that he wished he was going with him, when Tormund took the Wildlings back home beyond The Wall. After years being the reluctant leader, first of the Night’s Watch, then of the North, fighting endless battles along the way, Jon seemed exhausted by this episode, weighed down by everything he’s experienced and killing Dany clearly broke him (he seemed ready and willing for Drogon to end his life in the Throne Room and still seemed hollow on his arrival back at Castle Black) and Kit Harington was fantastic throughout this last chapter of Jon’s story. I never felt the emotional connection between Jon and Dany (another casualty of the rushing), but the actors nailed that final scene.

As Jaime Lannister could have told him, killing your King, or Queen, even if done for the greater good, will leave an indelible mark on your name. Had Jon been applauded for saving the kingdom, I’d have felt it unrealistic. Was anyone expecting him to stay at The Wall? Who knows, but that last look back to the gate, as it closed behind him, seemed to me to be Jon Snow’s way of saying goodbye to his past and seeing him ride off with Tormund, Ghost (the reunion we’d all been hoping for) and the Wildlings, in to woods no longer filled with the danger of the Army of the Dead thanks to him, seemed the most fitting end to his story.

Ser Brienne of Tarth, Lord Commander of the Kingsguard – a beloved character who deserved to achieve her greatest dream

Brienne is one of the few characters in Game of Thrones who has always been truly honourable and since her introduction I’ve grown to love her and root for her to show the world how incredible a woman she is. Therefore, one of the highlights of this finale for me was seeing Brienne taking her place first as one of those representatives tasked with choosing the next ruler, and then on the Small Council, where she can help build a better future for the citizens of The Six Kingdoms (that still sounds odd to me). Who better to be Commander of Bran’s Kingsguard?

Having been knighted in 8.02 (one of the best scenes in the series for me) as a knight of the realm, once Sansa split the north away from the other kingdoms, it made sense to me that Brienne would step up in this way. Sansa has the support of the entire North again. She’s home and safe, so Brienne can move on to serve and protect another of Catelyn’s children. She wanted to be a knight, she wanted to serve the realm and she’s always wanted to do good. If any character deserved to see their dreams come true in a world were we are used to that rarely happening, it was Brienne. The fact it is Brienne, who gets to take over from Jaime Lannister in her new role, is the final piece of the puzzle (I don’t count The Mountain).

Speaking of Jaime, the scene I’d said for years that I wanted to see if he really had to die, was Brienne filling his pages in the Kingsguard book with his good deeds. Ever since vile Joffrey mocked him for his empty pages and Brienne read the words, I’ve wondered if this would be part of the ending. Personally, I loved it and it was the scene that made me the most emotional this week. I know many have grumbled about Brienne doing this after Jaime left her in 8.04, seeing it as a woman serving the story of a man, but that’s not how I see this plot line at all. Yes, it completed Jaime’s story and yes, she perhaps described the events in the most favourable way, but bear in mind for his entire adult life, he was viewed in a negative light for an action which, like Jon’s, was for the greater good. Seeing the devastation Dany caused only reinforced just how significant his choice was when he killed the Mad King. Yes, he broke Brienne’s heart and I hated it (putting them together in 8.04 both gave me what I wanted, while also giving me what I didn’t – thanks again to the rushing), but I also loved that be giving us this scene, they also brought to the forefront again, how special Brienne is.

She has always done what was just and honourable and has always believed in the good in people and it was because of her that many of the deeds she added to the book even happened! Jaime may have hurt her, but we saw she wasn’t bitter and wanted the good he did to be recorded. She didn’t let his last action cancel out all the others. I also loved that it was clear in that scene that she still cared deeply for him and had forgiven him for being unable to leave his past behind. Why do I say that? She still carried Oathkeeper; in such a sparse room there was a lion statue prominent on the table behind her; and the music playing over the scene was (I think) a blend of “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms” (played when she was knighted) and “I Am Hers, She Is Mine” (which has accompanied scenes with both Robb/Tulisa and Tyrion/Shae), reinforcing the special connection they shared. Add to that, the beautiful performance by Gwendoline Christie (she better be nominated for awards); you see the emotion Brienne is holding back in her eyes as she writes, as she takes her time to complete her task, all before she runs her hand over the page gently before closing it. Yes, it gives Jaime closure and honour again, but it also is a testament to who she is as a person. If we were all a little more like Brienne, we’d all be better for it.

Few characters so richly deserved to end their story with all the respect and status they’d always dreamed of. I’m only sad we won’t get to see all the good deeds that she will do, that will fill her own pages.

A final musical chapter for television’s most ambitious soundtrack

I’m a big fan of film and television scores and few are ever as impressive as this one and a consistent comment about season eight from me and many others, has been just how incredible Ramin Djawadi’s score has been. Over the years, he has created beautiful themes for characters, Houses, while setting the mood for every political manoeuvre and shredding our nerves while watching every battle.

Season eight has seen him play with themes to great emotional effect and The Iron Throne was no different. His slower rendition of The Rains of Castamere, associated so heavily with the violence of The Red Wedding, heightened Tyrion’s grief and I’ve already spoken above about his delicate way of bringing the history of Jaime and Brienne’s relationship in to the story’s end. Dany’s tragic end contained callbacks to her and Jon’s theme and we also had the rousing farewell to the Starks, blending the theme most associated with their House, with the series’s theme, while also throwing in echoes of their past (Arya sailed away to echoes of the same theme she had at the end of season 4 for example). Few shows have scores that are so ingrained in the emotions of the scenes, that you can see them as you listen to the music on its own, but season 8’s music in particular certainly achieves this. Ramin, please hurry up and announce international dates for the next Game of Thrones music tour! Until then, I’ll have the albums on my constant playlist!

A visual masterpiece, setting a new bar for television & film!

Even those less happy with this season have agreed that visually, nothing compares to Game of Thrones, in terms of the quality of the cinematography, visual effects and overall production values. In a way, I think we’ve become complacent about how each episode has a visual quality that surpasses not just other television shows, but most films too and the finale certainly didn’t drop the ball in this area.

We had the terrifying images of Dany addressing her armies, the breathtaking image of her literally being a dragon, as Drogon’s wings unfolded behind her, the haunting echoes of her vision of coming face to face with the throne and the incredible framing of her death in Jon’s arms. Drogon has now become so realistic, that you simply accept that there’s a huge dragon on screen, screaming at the loss of its mother, nudging her lifeless body and then unleashing fire, finally removing the damn throne from the world! Plus, that Stark montage? Gorgeous. I only hope this series has set the bar for other shows to try and surpass in the future.

Then there were all the little nods / call backs to the last eight years…..

Okay, I admit, I didn’t pick up on all of these on the first viewing and I assume I’ve not even noticed them all yet, but the series finale was full of nods to the show’s past, some obvious and some wonderfully subtle. There were the breathtaking costume choices (look at Sansa’s coronation dress – weirwood leaves, dire wolves and fish scales, to represent every aspect of her heritage), the old jokes (Tyrion is clearly never meant to finish that brothel joke, while Stannis’ influence on Davos’ grammar remains strong). Lord Varys was also annoyingly correct that the history books won’t mention Tyrion (boo!), although giving the book the obvious title was a bit cheesy, while Tyrion has gone from the rebel in the Small Council dragging the chairs around, to the man leading a group of his own choosing.

We had Greyworm keeping his promise to Missandei and heading to the beaches of Naath, while Arya, the girl who was once no one, sailed away proudly declaring she was a Stark. We also saw a nod to how The Iron Throne is described in George R.R. Martin’s books when Dany recalls what she’d heard about it, a possible appearance by Hoyland Reed at the Dragonpit gathering, as well as a nod to Martin’s as-yet unwritten seventh book, A Dream of Spring, with the green shoot visible through the snow, as Jon leaves The Wall, as well as a mirror of how episode one began, as the gates of Castle Black rose to let him pass through. Each one of these made the conclusion to the series more satisfying for me. Feel free to point out all the ones I’ve missed!

Looking forward, by looking backwards

It’s sad to end this post without being able to speculate on what will happen in the next episode. Instead, we have a number of prequels in various stages of development to look forward to. They are all being made with HBO, so the production quality should remain and George R.R Martin is involved too, in some more than others. We don’t know much yet, other than the rumours that the first of these prequels to go in to production is going to look at the first Long Night. The casting for this series also has me hopeful, as it contains some of my favourite stage actors (especially Denise Gough, John Heffernan). Nothing can replace Game of Thrones for me in this world; the characters are just too special, but I’ll certainly be tuning in.

………………………

I might write a few posts reflecting on various aspects of the series, now that the story and the characters’ journeys can be viewed as a whole, but for now, I’ll end by saying, that despite my sadness that season eight was so short, when there was enough rich material to give us so much more, I’m satisfied with how the story ended. Overall, it made sense to me, even the elements that I’d loved to have turned out differently (I’m looking at you Jaime and Dany). Few shows grab my attention the way this one has (it was after season two that I read the books) and few stories have offered me so many incredibly complex and compelling characters to invest in emotionally. It’ll be a series I return to many times in the future and it will undoubtably remain one of my favourites and for that I’m grateful to everyone who has had a hand in its creation.

…….Is it too soon for a rewatch…………?

Game of Thrones may have ended, but don’t forget that the two hour documentary, charting the making of this final season airs next Sunday on HBO in the USA and next Monday on Sky Atlantic in the UK. Watch the trailer for it here: https://youtu.be/9K7c0jXkaGc

(All screenshots owned by HBO/Game of Thrones)